Cooling down stretching for fitness and exercise

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Cooling Down following Running and Exercise

When you have undertaken strenuous exercise or running, it is important to cool down in a controlled way. The first exercise is gentle walking until your breathing returns to normal, especially after running. Then you need to systematically stretch the muscles you have been using to maintain suppleness and flexibility of the muscles and joints. The exercises below show how you can stretch different parts of the body.

Cool Down by Stretching Calf Muscle

Cool Down stretching calf musclesIt is important to stretch your calf muscles during Cool Down, especially for running. This helps to avoid the onset of cramp during training.
. . . technique for stretching calf muscles
 

Cool Down by Stretching Ham String

It is important to stretch your ham string muscles during Cool Down, especially for running. This helps to avoid injury during training, and prolonged recovery.
. . . technique for stretching ham string

Cool Down by Stretching Ham String

Cool Down by Lunge Stretching

The lunge forward will stretch your groin muscles during Cool Down, and increase flexibility for your legs. It is an important Cool Down exercise for running, and helps to avoid pulling muscles in the groin area during training.
. . . technique for lunge stretching

Cool Down by Lunge Stretching

Cool Down by Stretching Groin Muscles

It is important to stretch your groin muscles during Cool Down. This helps to avoid injury due to over-stretching during training.
. . . technique for stretching groin muscles

Cool Down by Stretching Groin

Cool Down by Stretching Quadriceps

Stretch your quadriceps during Cool Down, especially for running. This helps to avoid the onset of cramp during training.
. . . technique for stretching quardiceps

Cool Down by Stretching Quadriceps

Cool Down by Stretching and Raising your Back

Stretch your back during Cool Down. This helps to avoid the onset of back pain.
. . . technique for stretching and raising your back

stretching and raising your back

Cool Down by Stretching your Lower Back

Stretch your lower back during Cool Down. This helps to avoid the onset of back pain and strain.
. . . technique for stretching your lower back

Lower back stretch

Cool Down by Stretching your Shoulders

Stretch your shoulders during Cool Down. This helps to avoid injury due to strain.
. . . technique for stretching your shoulders

Stretching shoulders exercise

Cool Down by Stretching your Triceps

Stretch your triceps during Cool Down. This helps to avoid injury due to strain.
. . . technique for stretching your triceps

Stretching triceps exercise

Cool Down by Stretching your Obliques

Stretch your obliques during Cool Down. This helps to avoid injury due to strain, and maintains suppleness.
. . . technique for stretching your obliques

Stretching obliques

If you take time to cool down properly after strenuous exercise, you will be less prone to injury and muscle strain. Cooling down is not lost time. If you are injured you will not be able to exercise, and your fitness training schedule or routine will be set back. Time for exercise includes time for proper warm up and cooling down.

At first you may find that you take a considerable time to cool down. For example, although you shower soon after stopping exercise, you may continue to perspire for some time. This is not convenient if you exercise before travelling to work and have deadlines to keep. The problem is that your body and metabolism are not used to dealing with exercise and its consequences, and they need time to adjust to your new living pattern. The good news is that your body will get used to this activity pattern, and will adjust more quickly. You will cool down faster, and your heart rate and breathing will settle down more quickly once your body and metabolism get used to the new you.

Meanwhile, you can help the cooling process by having a cooler (not cold) shower than usual, and by drinking to replace body fluids and rehydrate.

 

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